Service

by Grant Souders

$16.95

“Souders risks that most dismissible of poetic virtues: sincerity. . . . Such sincerity reveals itself as a terrain, a ground, a place of founding and so also a place of finding. It makes of Souders’s poems something akin to ‘a fire to look at / and look by.’ The object of our meditation is also the object that gives us vision — the poem, these poems, which do not play for us a tune, but give us ‘a tune we could play into.’” — Dan Beachy-Quick, in a Boston Review “Poet’s Sampler”

Format: paperback

ISBN: 978-1-936797-95-0 Categories: , , Tag:

July Open Reading Period selection

How do we see the things that show us the other things we are among? The poems of Grant Souders’s first book are a conjuring. Service is born in utterance, with an opening eye, with the bareness that is there: the root of being in the word is. There’s an implication of narrative arc in the poet’s semblance of creation myth, beginning in nakedness and ending in everything. Here is a book that finds itself by leaving this world and reaching for the cosmos, if only to look back.

“Souders risks that most dismissible of poetic virtues: sincerity. . . . Such sincerity reveals itself as a terrain, a ground, a place of founding and so also a place of finding. It makes of Souders’s poems something akin to ‘a fire to look at / and look by.’ The object of our meditation is also the object that gives us vision — the poem, these poems, which do not play for us a tune, but give us ‘a tune we could play into.’” — Dan Beachy-Quick, in a Boston Review “Poet’s Sampler”

from Creek

If when you go to Pickett Creek,

and having gone there you think back on it.

Or back in it,

That water, there, flecked with light

and the memory of it.

You hold things.

The water flecked

flocks of sunlight

in the way they hold

each other.

Additional information

Weight .4 lbs
Dimensions 6 x .5 x 9 in

Grant Souders holds a BFA from Colorado State University and an MFA from the University of Iowa’s Writers’ Workshop. He is co-author (with artist Nathaniel Whitcomb and musician Matthew Sage) of a collaborative music, art, and poetry book, A Singular Continent (Palaver Press, 2014). His poetry has appeared in the Denver Quarterly, iO, jubilat, and The Boston Review, and his visual art has been featured in a variety of Colorado galleries. He lives in Denver.

 

 

“The amazing achievement in Matt Donovan’s Rapture & the Big Bam is how well he balances the drive to speak intimately with the drive to shape a public (even civic) thought. His ease in following a leading image, trusting entirely that the image will speak far beyond anything he might have planned, makes for an authentic experience of surprise for a reader. His ear and his sense of line are controlled and idiosyncratic, glorious, raging, and fully in love with discovery.” — Lia Purpura