30/30 Project: Contributor Bios

January 2019 30/30 Poets:

Dale Champlin

After many years as a graphic designer, illustrator and copywriter, Dale Champlin now devotes most of her time to writing poetry. Her MFA in painting and photography developed her critical eye. As Oregon Poetry Association board member, she is the editor the Verseweavers poetry collections. Dale is the current director of Conversations With Writers, a monthly presentation by accomplished writers leading spirited discussions about the craft of writing. Dale has published in Social Justice Poetry, VoiceCatcher, North Coast Squid, Willawaw Journal and Mojave River Press and has poems soon to be published in Moments Before Midnight, Voices of Eve, and The Voices Project.

Tricia Knoll

Tricia Knoll

Tricia Knoll’s poetry has received 7 Pushcart nominations and is widely represented in dozens of journals and many anthologies — all visible on her website at triciaknoll.com. She has four collections in print: Urban Wild (Finishing Line Press); Ocean’s Laughter (Kelsay Books); Broadfork Farm (The Poetry Box), and How I Learned To Be White (Antrim House). How I Learned To Be White received the Gold Prize for Poetry Book Category for Motivational Poetry in the Human Relations Indie Book Prize for 2018. Knoll just completed a residency at Playa where she completed a manuscript of poems, One Bent Twig, which is looking for a publisher.

Georgia Pearle

Georgia Pearle

Georgia Pearle has been a coordinator of the VIDA Count as well as the senior digital editor for Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts. Her poems have been published by Ninth Letter, Kenyon Review Online, and WSQ, and are forthcoming with Crab Orchard Review. She was recently the recipient of the Inprint Marion Barthelme Prize in Creative Writing. She is currently finishing her doctorate in Creative Writing and Literature at the University of Houston, where she holds a CLASS Dissertation Completion Fellowship, and she is at work on a collection of poems as well as a memoir. You can find her online at www.gpearle.com.

ellie swensson

ellie swensson

ellie swensson is a queer southern ex-pat currently writing poems in denver, CO. she earned her MFA from Naropa in 2015 and is the founder and co-director of Bolder Writers Warehouse, a mobile writers’ community resource. she has over 5 years of curation experience including the reading series Bouldering Poets, collaborations with the City of Boulder’s Office and Art + Culture and the Jaipur Literature Festival, community workshops, independent book releases, and more. swensson is a firm believer that poetics is what occurs where eros, divinity, activism, and careful craft intersect. her poems are published in a handful of places you may know, but she prefers her words alive in the mouth and the body.

Meredith Thompson (MMThompson)

Meredith Thompson

Meredith Thompson (MMThompson) is a research scientist at the Education Arcade at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on the influence of collaboration and creativity in STEAM learning environments and practice-based teacher education. In her spare time, Meredith writes poetry and is in a band with her twin sister Chris (www.cmthompson.com). They codeveloped Soundscience Fun!, an interactive presentation on the physics of musical instruments that has been featured on the PBS television show “Curious George.”

Viviane Vives

Viviane Vives is a filmmaker, actor, photographer, and writer. A Fulbright scholar for Artistic Studies,–Tisch School of the Arts, NYU– her translation work, poems, and short stories have been published internationally. Some of Viviane’s recent publications are poetry in the Southeast Missouri University Press, a short story, “Todo es de Color, Children of Catalunya” in Litro Magazine of London, and a ten page story in The Write Launch: “In the oblique and dreamlike style of Marguerite Duras, Viviane Vives weaves memories of her ancestors and place—Nice, Barcelona, Perth, New South Wales, Texas—in “Dialogues With Your Notebook,” a stunning literary achievement.” 
 
She is also a Finalist of the Philadelphia Stories’ Sandy Crimmins National Prize in Poetry and Semifinalist of the American Short(er) Fiction Contest by American Short Fiction. Viviane is a nominee for Sundress Press’ Best of the Net Anthology Best of the Net 2018 for fiction by Burningword Literary Journal, whose editor Erik Deerly also included her in their Best of 2018 Anthology. Black Mountain Press also included her wok in their Best Sixty Four Poets of 2018 anthology. 
 
She writes in both, Spanish and English. Her first language was French and part of her family spoke Catalan at home. She learned Portuguese to be able to read Fernando Pessoa in his native language. In chronological order, the cities she has lived in for an extended period of time are: Barcelona, Paris, Madrid, New York, Sant Feliu de Guixols, Los Angeles, Austin, Sydney, and Perth. She’s currently back at ‘home’ in Austin, TX.

December 2018 30/30 Poets:

Steve Bellin-Oka

Steve Bellin-Oka

Steve Bellin-Oka is the recipient of a 2019 Tulsa Artist Fellowship from the George Kaiser Family Foundation. He is the author two chapbooks, O Frankenstein (2014) and Dead Letter Office at North Atlantic Station (2017), and his first book of poems, Instructions for Seeing a Ghost, is forthcoming in early 2020. His poems have appeared in Nimrod, Tar River Poetry, Mississippi Review, William and Mary Review, and Valparaiso Poetry Review, among other journals. He earned his MFA from the University of Virginia and his PhD from the University of Southern Mississippi’s Center for Writers. He has taught poetry writing and film studies at the University of Mississippi, Eastern New Mexico University, and St. Norbert College.


Karen Craigo

Karen Craigo

Karen Craigo‘s new full-length poetry collection, Passing Through Humansville, is out this month from Sundress Publications, who also published her first book, No More Milk (2016). She is a newspaper editor in Marshfield, Missouri.

 

 

Jefferson Duval

Jefferson Duval

Of autodidactic ilk, originally from Philadelphia, PA. Jefferson grew up listening to his father’s improv limericks, jazz, and on into hip-hop and folk music from Africa and the diaspora and other avant garde music. His writing began as journaling and evolved into poetic forms. He now works with professionals and business owners focusing on the power of language and inner narrative, it’s transformation an increase in purpose driven performance putting business in it’s proper context as a part of living. Writing and reading has been a key part of maintaining his golden thread.

 


Kelly Grace Gaddis

Kelle Grace Gaddis

Yellow Chair Review published Kelle Grace Gaddis’s first book, My Myths, in 2017. Other recently published works appear in BlazeVOX 15 & 17, Rye Whiskey Review, Chicken Soup For The Soul: Dreams & The Unexplainable, Dispatches Editions Resist Much / Obey Little, Vending Machine Presses Very Fine Writing, The Till,Five Willows Poetry Review, Thirteen Myna Birds Journal, Knot Literary Magazine, Entropy, DoveTales, and the forthcoming Fiction War Magazine Volume 8, 2019 and elsewhere. Ms. Gaddis has written several poetry chapbooks including It Is What It Is, It Was What It Was, Visions Of, and American Discard. She is honored to be one of 4Culture’s “Poetry on the Buses” contest winners in 2015 and 2017 and one of fourteen prize-winning finalists in the National Fiction War Contest / Summer 2018. She earned her MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Washington in 2014 (UWB). She works as a spiritual counselor and meditation instructor in Seattle, Washington where she lives with her partner Martin and cat Merlin.

CR Green

In July, 2016, CR Green participated in the 30/30 Project (as Candy Green Gustavson) using the Haibun to describe a month as a teacher in a women´s prison in Georgia, USA. The looming election and the execution the previous year of Kelly Gissendaner (most likely the last woman to be executed in Georgia) who had been housed at the prison strongly influenced CR´s thoughts and words throughout the month–especially the words of Walt Whitman. Having returned to life in New Zealand, she continues to write poetry, participating in workshops, and facilitating two writing groups for women–one in the city of Christchurch and the other in her little seaside village at the ends of the earth.

Liezel Moraleja Hackett

Liezel Moraleja Hackett

Liezel Moraleja Hackett received an MFA in Creative Writing and Poetics from the University of Washington Bothell. She teaches Filipino Folk dance, which inspired a lot of work in her first completed manuscript, an experimental memoir that dwells in the space between movement (dance) and limitation (illness or disease). Her poetry can be found in the 2017 and 2018 issues of Clamor Literary Journal.

Jeffrey Levine

Jeffrey Levine

Jeffrey Levine is the author of three books of poetry: Rumor of Cortez, nominated for a 2006 Los Angeles Times Literary Award in Poetry, Mortal, Everlasting, which won the 2002 Transcontinental Poetry Prize, and At the Kinnegad Home for the Bewildered, coming in March from Salmon Press. In addition to his own writing, he is principal translator of Canto General, Pablo Neruda’s major work. Levine’s many poetry prizes include the Larry Levis Prize from the Missouri Review, the James Hearst Poetry Prize from North American Review, the Mississippi Review Poetry Prize, the Ekphrasis Poetry Prize (three times), and the American Literary Review poetry prize. His poems have garnered 21 Pushcart nominations. A graduate of the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers, Levine is founder, Artistic Director and Publisher of Tupelo Press, an award‐winning independent literary press located in the historic NORAD Mill in the Berkshire Mountains of Western Massachusetts. In addition, he served for seven formative years as core faculty of the Colrain Manuscript Conferences and has directed of the esteemed Tupelo Press Writing Conferences for the past eight years. Levine is also an accomplished musician: a concert clarinetist (Buffalo Philharmonic the New York City Opera Orchestra), jazz guitarist and pianist.

Artist’s Statement:
 
I’m interested in exploring the nimbus that emanates from and surrounds our everyday
wanderings in this life: what we do, we human animals, how we think about what we do, how
we do or fail to do what we do, what we think about doing next to exalt, exult, lament, atone.
The poems explore the dramatic tension between what we seem to experience and what a
dispassionate, rather omni-valent, omniscient historian might have to say by way of
disagreement. So, herein, a parsing of the many overlapping psychological spiritual, physical
and, frankly, liminal worlds that we simultaneously inhabit.


Sarah Terry

Sarah Terry

Sarah Terry is a freelance software developer who spends most of her free time running elaborate games of Dungeons and Dragons, complete with potion props, wax-sealed letters, and plenty of poetic prophecy. She received her MFA in poetry from the University of New Hampshire and her work has previously appeared in RHINO Poetry, Strange Horizons, Star*Line, and other publications.

 

 

Emily Vieweg

Emily Vieweg

Emily holds an MFA from Lindenwood University and is originally from St. Louis, Missouri. Her work has been published in Foliate Oak, The Voices Project, Red Weather Literary Magazine, Soundings Review, Art Young’s Good Morning, The Basil O’Flaherty Feminist Voices, Indolent Books What Rough Beast, and more. Emily is a staunch supporter of human rights, equity, and helping others share their voices. Emily lives in Fargo, North Dakota where she is a mother of two, volunteer cat wrangler and office assistant.


 

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